Tag Archives: learn

Digging Into Collaborative Inquiry

Over the past few weeks, I have been taking some time to dig more deeply into collaborative inquiry.

Screen Shot 2014-07-22 at 10.39.28 AMI began reading Jenni Donohoo’s book Collaborative Inquiry for Educators: A Facilitator’s Guide to School Improvement, which is a valuable resource for anyone involved in education.  It contains not only clear, research-based information about CI, but also includes excellent examples of how to facilitate learning through CI.

Image shared under a Creative Commons attribution license by ThinkPublic
Image shared under a Creative Commons attribution license by ThinkPublic

After reading through the whole book quickly, I sat down to dig more deeply into some of the ideas, and I was stopped on the very first page.  It’s here that Jenni discusses the two different types of challenges we face as educators.

“Technical” challenges are those we face regularly, and where we have set protocols and solutions to come to the resolution we are looking for.  We have the capacity and will to solve them as part of our daily work.

“Adaptive” challenges, on the other hand, are challenges that require new learning.  They are problems that old solutions don’t work for any more, or new challenges that we don’t know how to address.  In order to tackle these new challenges, we need to rethink what we believe to be true.

Shared through a Creative Commons attribution license by Nick Fletcher
Shared through a Creative Commons attribution license by Nick Fletcher

We have to “adopt new values and beliefs” (p. 1) before we can solve adaptive challenges.

As the world continues to change at an exponential pace, educators face more and more adaptive challenges.  The old models of “school” don’t work in our connected world, and our methods must evolve to support our students to thrive in today’s reality.

Adaptive change is particularly difficult because it requires that we reconstruct our understanding of our work.

As we work together to solve adaptive challenges, our thinking changes, and our way of doing business changes with it.  As we adapt to these new challenges, it changes us.

Image shared through a Creative Commons attribution license by B K
Image shared through a Creative Commons attribution license by B K

For me, one of my greatest personal challenges is engaging leaders in the notion that connecting, sharing, and learning together – modelling the change we want to see in our students’ learning – is important and worthwhile.

This simple explanation of adaptive challenges, and the fundamental change in thinking and acting that must accompany our response, helps me to better understand the difficulties we face in trying to adapt an entire system to the realities of the world today.

How are you adapting to new challenges in education?

 

 

 

What Does a “Lead Learner” Actually Do?

A few weeks back, I was asked to work with some educators who were at the senior management level in their board.  They told me that they wanted everyone in the organization to model the kind of learning they wanted to see at the classroom level.

We were specifically working on ways to make thinking and learning visible to a wide audience, inviting feedback and conversation.

Certainly we want all of our learners to engage with a broad audience and learn with others outside of their immediate classroom.  But if we want to model the kind of learning we expect to see in classrooms, we need a clear picture of what that should look like.

In Ontario, we have several documents to guide our thinking about what classrooms should look like.  I have outlined some of those documents below.

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Achieving Excellence: A Renewed Vision for Education in Ontario:

http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/about/excellent.html

Specifically:  To achieve success, Ontario will:

• Invest in the technology, design and infrastructure required for the classrooms of the future to serve the needs of all communities.

• Invest in innovative teaching practices and instructional methods enabled by technology to more precisely engage and address the learning needs of all students.

• Give students more flexibility and ownership in their learning, allowing them, for example, to determine whether they want to spend more time on elearrning or on learning outside of the classroom

• Provide new online learning and professional development opportunities for both teachers and students, particularly those in rural and remote communities, including opportunities for virtual cooperative education placements.

 

A Student’s View of the Future: Learning in Ontario

http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/students/speakup/preMSAC.html

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http://www.videodelivery.gov.on.ca/player/download.php?file=http://www.media.gov.on.ca/a0efff64e63ac895/en/pages/text.html

 

“I’m an Ontario student, and my world is constantly changing.

I live in a world where technology is everywhere.

I can connect with a friend in another part of the globe, just as easily as I can with a friend down the street.

When I graduate high school, I will enter a world that is more competitive and connected than ever before.

My education will prepare me for that world.

My school will be a place where my friends and I can be successful, regardless of where we come from.

A place where we are inspired to learn by engaging teachers using new technology.

Our diversity will not be a barrier, but rather a reason for our success.

We will develop the strength of character to overcome obstacles and be resilient, whatever comes our way.

We will feel safe and welcome, and know that our well-being is supported inside and outside of school.

We will be the innovators, community builders, creators, skilled workers, entrepreneurs and leaders of tomorrow.

As an Ontario student, I will achieve excellence.”

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To achieve this in our classrooms, what practices need to be modelled by educators?

A good starting point is the ISTE Standards for students, teachers, coaches (professional learning facilitators) and administrators.

This is a sample of the first two standards for school and system leaders:

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As leaders, what are we modelling?

As leaders, what practices do we need to change to ensure we are modelling the kind of learning we want for our students?  What supports do we need to get there?

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Further: In Ontario, as we consider the ways we ask our students to engage in pedagogical documentation, how are we modelling this practice for our students?  How do we document our own professional learning?

You can find some great thinking on this topic on the Langwitches Blog here:  http://langwitches.org/blog/2014/07/01/documenting-for-learning/

 

Sharing our Passion for Connecting Education Leaders: TEDxKitchenerED

Mark Carbone and I recently took advantage of the opportunity to share our passion for connecting education leaders at the TEDxKitchenerED event.

If you are wondering about #OSSEMOOC, here is the story of how we are working to connect leaders, and helping Ontario learners, to thrive in the complexities of teaching and learning in today’s rapidly changing world.

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Do You Believe in Science?

This evening, a friend shared this article about a MP from BC who challenges science while in the House of Commons.

It led to this hilarious video, which really made me think about the pervasive misunderstandings we tolerate in society when it comes to science.

Will today’s children continue to accept a Canadian government that makes major policy decisions based on belief rather than science?

Will they have the solid understanding of science they will need understand the long-term consequences of their actions?

What Did You Learn? Who Did You Learn it From?

Dean Shareski posed this question at #canedu14 on Friday.  Darren Kuropatwa demonstrated how we could “harvest” (@jennzia) that learning in a shared video (below).

 

At #edCampIsland the next day, I shared the video with a few people at the end of the day.  Immediately, they said wait, we need to do that too.

Luckily I had one of my go-go-gadget friends along (Andy Forgrave, @aforgrave) and I knew he would relish the opportunity to create the video.

I wasn’t wrong.  He put together this wonderful collection of our learning through our edCamp conversations.

 

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Day 18: What Are We Trying To Do Here, Anyway?

fryed:

Here is the writing that I published on the “30 Days of Learning” Project on the #OSSEMOOC website (ossemooc.wordpress.com).

Originally posted on Ontario School and System Leaders Edtech MOOC:

Written and shared by Donna Miller Fry

If you are like me, you sometimes hook on to ideas and run with them.

The excitement, the possibilities, it all pulls you in and you just go with it.

But those around you may not be entirely sure of what it is that you are trying to do.  Being able to clearly communicate, at a level where everyone understands your thinking, is an important component to effecting change.

Yesterday, I had the opportunity to present the #OSSEMOOC concept to a group of interested people.  Luckily, before my presentation, a colleague worked with me to help me distill the concept down to its key components, in a language that was meaningful to educators at all levels.

As we begin to work on our next projects in response to user requests and feedback, I think it is a good time to take a step…

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Stories of Open Sharing – And Why It Is Important

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Alan Levine (@cogdog) is a champion of open storytelling.

I followed Alan for years on Twitter before finally meeting him in person first in Terrace Bay (video below) and then again at Unplug*d12.

He asked me for our story about the time Commander Hadfield tweeted me to say that up in the ISS, he had watched the video my students helped create.  You can read the story here, but the full version, including the connections that led to the connections that led to the event, is told below.

Alan’s version can be found here.

I hope this inspires people to open their practice and put learning for all at the centre of everything they do.

Alan Levine, thanks for pushing me to do better, all the time.

Dean Shareski, thanks for modelling open and connected in all you do.

How I met the cogdog!

What Am I Doing Here?

It’s the first morning of #OTRK12. 

There are over 80 workshops for educators to attend over the next 2 days, and some of those presenters are waking up this morning and asking themselves, “What am I doing here?”.

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Presenting can be scary.  It can be intimidating.  We, as educators, can be evaluative. We all want to do well.  It’s our culture.

 

What are you doing here?

You are modelling best practice.  You are sharing your learning.

You are enabling others to learn.

You are connecting learners.  You are enriching lives. You are demonstrating courage.

You are walking the talk. You are Leading Learning.

 

What are the rest of us doing here?

We are here creating a culture of learning – a place where it is safe to share, where sharing is valued, and where the people with the courage to share are encouraged and applauded for putting themselves in that vulnerable position for our benefit.

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We are nurturing all learners.

Congratulations, and thank you, to every single educator who has stepped forward today and tomorrow to share learning with the rest of us.

Image credits:

Fear -the Italian voice via Compfight cc

Courage – DimitraTzanos via Compfight cc

 

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Focus on Beginners: What do you Need to Start Connecting?

Originally posted on Ontario School and System Leaders Edtech MOOC:

As we have travelled throughout the province this week, we have heard loud and clear that we need an easier entry point for our education leaders to start the connecting process.

Last Tuesday, connected leaders met to discuss how they became connected leaders – the catalyst that got them started.  Here are some of the things we learned.  Which of these do you need?  Which of these can you bring to a leader you know to help them connect?

1. TIME!  When can we possibly find the time to connect?

http://www.flickr.com/photos/76818399@N00/4536146692/

Educators are busy.  Nobody disputes that!  But could connecting actually make your life easier?  YES IT CAN!  You can pose a question on Twitter 24/7 and get an answer in minutes.  We have heard many stories with this theme.

Learn to make time.  Start with 15 minutes each day.  Some of us do “Tea and Twitter”,  some of us start…

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