Tag Archives: assessment

#InnovatorsMindset Blog Hop 4: Resources on Assessment for Learning

It’s March Break, and while I am taking some time away from thinking hard about innovation and education, I have been collecting some great resources that I will use to write a response to this blog hop question in a few days.

The provocation:

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Here are some of the resources I have been reading to prepare for this weeks’ blog hop.

One of the most powerful paragraphs comes from Will Richardson:

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Is the best measurement that which determines how motivated a student is to learn more?

Further Resources:

Joe Bower: Assessment and Measurement are NOT the Same Thing

The RSA: Re-imagined System Leadership

 

Michael Fullan: How testing does not align with our education goals

Danger of the Dunning-Kruger Effect

Creating Innovators by Tony Wagner and Robert Compton

Most Likely to Succeed: Preparing out Kids for the Innovation Era by Tony Wagner and Ted Dintersmith

Most Likely to Succeed (the movie)

Working at the Edge: Kinds of School Leaders

OECD: The Nature of Learning

Chris Wejr: Are we Marking Assignments or Assessing Learning?

Dean Shareski on Exemplars

BBC: Stress and Teens

BBC: Robotics used to give financial advice

Pedagogical Documentation (Ontario)

The Gap Between Educators

Robot-Proof: How Colleges Can Keep People Relevant in the Workplace by Joseph Aoun

 

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Learning not Grades: Answers from #Educon

Educon, for me, has always been such a hotbed of fresh ideas.

This year, the theme of Educon 2.8 is EMPOWERMENT.

Here is part of the Friday night panel conversation that seriously resonated with me.  I didn’t ask the question, but I am thankful to the person who did.

How do we transform students from learning for their grades to learning for knowledge?

 

 

College in some ways hinders that opportunity for growth when it comes to ideas.  I have said to my sister, “Don’t go to college.  I will help you create an idea instead”.

Will your fails from your ideas be bigger than the debt from going to college?  When you go to college you come out with big debt and then you have to work for someone else to pay it off.

“It isn’t that important to have good grades.  The work ethic involved in getting those good grades, though, will help with building your own company.”

Jeff Boodie @jboodie @jobsnap

 

 

I definitely think that children love to learn, they love knowledge, but I think students have become a victim, a monster of sorts, that we create, and they are the ones…

the culture we create, creates the kind of student that only understands learning in terms of grades, and so it’s not that young people have to fix that, it’s that we as educators and school administrators and as a culture have to figure out…

which is what Jeff was exactly alluding to…

which that we have gotten to such a narrow path of understanding.

I would really think that it is our ultimate challenge as the educators of children and leaders of learning to understand that we are we on a very, very narrow path of knowledge, and defining it, and reducing it, and measuring it, and KILLING it, ultimately.

And so that is the thing that has to change on OUR end before we can expect our kids to do it.”

Helen Gym @HelenGym2015

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(Shouldn’t this be a priority in our teacher education programs?)

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How do we transform students from learning for their grades to learning for knowledge? What do you think?

 

 

 

 

It’s Not Reform we Need, It’s a Revolution

Update: July 12/12: http://www.scoop.it/t/leading-learning/p/2159233406/we-need-different-not-better

I will just quote Will Richardson, because I can’t think of a better way to say it!

* We don’t need better assessments; we need different assessments that help us understand students as learners and constructors of their own ongoing education instead of knowers of information and narrow skills.
* We don’t need better teachers; we need different teachers who see their roles as master learners first and content guides or experts second.
* We don’t need better schools; we need different schools that function as communities of inquiry and learning instead of delivery systems for a highly proscribed, traditional curriculum.

… the idea of a fully networked, progressive learning environment would for the vast majority constitute *different* and would require us… to redefine the future.

http://willrichardson.com/post/26655603242/redefine-better

Sir Ken Robinson on revolutionizing education.

Watch it here on YouTube: http://www.ted.com/talks/sir_ken_robinson_bring_on_the_revolution.html

Hear this in the context of “Building a Better Classroom” on NPR TED Radio Hour: http://www.npr.org/programs/ted-radio-hour/