Tag Archives: Bill Ferriter

Are Teachers Taught About Creative Commons?

Earlier this week, I worked with my fellow OSAPAC member (and chair) Mark Carbone to share some thinking around Creative Commons Licensing with educators at #CATC15

The title of this post, “Are Teachers Taught About Creative Commons”, was one of the questions from the group of educators we were learning with.  This brings up another issue about who owns the learning when it comes to teacher education, but that question is for another day.  For now, it is important to understand why being fluent in using Creative Commons is very important to the maker culture in the classroom.

There are many resources for educators to learn about how to use Creative Commons.  We wanted to focus more on the “why“.

Last week, George Couros shared his work on the innovator’s mindset.  He suggested that innovative practice requires both networking and remix.

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How do we encourage “remix” with our students and educators?

Stages of Becoming a Maker
Image created and shared by Dr. Jackie Gerstein https://usergeneratededucation.wordpress.com/2015/07/28/stages-of-being-a-maker-learner/

If we are going to encourage copying and remixing, it is essential that teachers understand proper use of licensing.

Teachers need to help students license their work in a way that will encourage properly attributed use, and encourage further creativity.

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Shared under a Creative Commons attribution non-commercial share-alike license by Darren Kuropatwa

Modelling the use of Creative Commons Licensing of work provides a structure for thinking in a positive way about creativity, sharing, and remixing.

Where can you find more help in understanding Creative Commons Licensing?  Bill Ferriter has provided an excellent page of resources here.  In Ontario, Rodd Lucier is one of our best experts and he has written profusely on the topic.

How do you find Creative Commons Licensed work?  A number of search engines can be found here:  http://search.creativecommons.org/

Resources

Compfight – choose CC licensed images (HTML embed code for attribution provided for bloggers and online teachers)

OSSEMOOC – Photo Sharing with Flickr

This amazing resource from Gail Desler: Can I Use That? A Guide To Creative Commons

“Engagement” is a Low Bar

Have you ever experienced so much learning that your head hurts?

Tonight, amid the beautiful sunset, the lightning show and the Perseid Meteor Shower, many educators are reflecting and thinking about today’s amazing learning at #CATC15.

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I started to write some notes about today’s learning, but why should I hide those ideas away in a notebook that nobody may ever look at again?

Image shared by Sylvia Duckworth BY-NC-SA
Image shared by Sylvia Duckworth BY-NC-SA

Besides, the Innovator’s Mindset is about creating something with that learning, right?

I’m thinking a lot tonight about the conversation I had with George Couros and Mark Carbone today about the focus schools have on “student engagement”.   “Engagement” has been a buzz word in Ontario for a long time.  I remember a similar discussion at Educon in 2014 with David Jakes and Bill Ferriter about how engagement is not enough.  It’s a start, but empowerment is a much more important goal for learners.

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Shared by Bill Ferriter under a BY-NC CC license

 

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Shared by Bill Ferriter under a BY-NC CC license.

 

Last March, Andy Hargreaves explored thinking around student engagement with education leaders at #uLead15.  Mark digs into this more here.

As George Couros said today, “engagement” still requires someone or something else to create the learning environment.  Without the entertaining venue, the learning stops.

How are we ensuring that our students truly become self-directed curious learners?  How do we empower learners to truly own their own learning?

 

 

Resources:

Should We Be Engaging or Empowering Learners?  Bill Ferriter’s blog

Why Do [Our Students] Need Connected Leaders?

This month, most of my writing time has been spent on a daily blog for OSSEMOOC, the project I co-lead with Mark Carbone in our current roles with OSAPAC in Ontario.

We say that “connected learners need connected leaders”.

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We work every single day trying to convince education leaders in Ontario that they need to become proficient in digital spaces and they need to become connected learners.

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Image shared under a Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike License by Justice Beitzel.

Why do we say this?  Why are we so passionate about this work?

Why do we need educators to be connected leaders?

1.  Innovation isn’t cultivated through isolation.

Participating in open networks gives ideas opportunities to spread.  “Crowd Accelerated Innovation” is a concept explained by Chris Anderson in this TED Talk.  If we want to build innovative schools and systems in education, our leaders must be connected to the best ideas.

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2. Digital citizenship is not something to be taught in isolation as a “subject”.

Digital citizenship is a way of being, to be integrated into all that we do (@TanyaAvrith).

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Digital citizenship is part of who we are, and education leaders need an established positive digital footprint to fully understand this, and to embrace the digital world our students exist in.

3Screen Shot 2014-11-25 at 7.55.10 PMIf you don’t understand the digital environment, you are becoming illiterate.  Doug Belshaw explains the essential elements of digital literacies in his TEDxTalk.

4.  Our learning community exists in BOTH physical and digital spaces.

This quote from Dr. John Malloy, currently the Director of Education for HWDSB, reminds us of the critical importance of choosing leaders with the capacity to make great decisions about student learning in both physical and digital spaces:

Using technology is no longer an option for us.  We must support our students to succeed in our physical and digital world.  

Students who do not have this opportunity to learn in the digital world will be disadvantaged, something that we cannot accept.”

UPDATE: Our learners, our audience and our community are in online spaces.  We need to be where they are.

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5. “Isolation is inconsistent with professional practice“.

Catherine Montreuil, Director of Education, BGCDSB, August 2014

(Update: Catherine Montreuil is now the Assistant Deputy Minister of Education, Learning and Curriculum – July 2015)

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We can’t just “close the door and teach” any more.  The smartest
person in the room is the room, unless someone in the room is a connected leader, and then it’s the world.  We need leaders who bring the world to their schools and districts.

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6. Connected learning must be modelled at all levels.

Today, it’s no longer about content.  It’s about networks.  Leaders need to model networked learning for teachers and students.  Connected leaders demonstrate that networking is a priority. We need to show our students what our learning looks like.  We need to demonstrate to teachers how we learn.  We need to share our thinking, leave it open to conversations, and let it be questioned.

7. As leaders, our professional portfolios should be ePortfolios, online where we can model this practice for others, and demonstrating how our work aligns with the Leadership Framework.  George Couros has written about this extensively.

8. We have a moral imperative to share.

Sometimes, leaders are very fortunate to be able to travel to a learning event such as a conference.  All that learning needs to be shared!

Screen Shot 2014-11-25 at 10.15.44 PMLive-tweeting at the event is a great start, but why shouldn’t everyone could benefit from your learning?  When you share the learning on your blog, it becomes searchable to everyone.  Educators from around the world now have free access to that learning.

If nobody shares, nobody learns!  Put Open and Access at the centre of your learning.

9.  As a connected leader, you bring a world of learning to your practice.

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If leaders aren’t learning online, how can they make good decisions around what technology to purchase with public funds, and what learning is required so the teachers can make effective use of technology for deep learning in their classrooms?

From the blog
From the blog “Principally Speaking”. Click on the image for the link.

Leaders must be participating in “deep learning” so they can understand what that learning looks like, and they can make valid, essential decisions about how to spend funds and time that are critical to moving learning forward.

Update: If leaders do not understand how technology can enable their learning to become a seamless part of their daily lives, they will not understand the importance of their students’ access to the tools for learning.

If you are not a connected leader, there is no better time to start!  OSSEMOOC shows you how in 10 minutes a day.

Update: 10. The End Game Keeps Changing: What’s an Education Worth Having in 2015?

Getting better at old strategies won’t work.  An education worth having in 2015 is not the same as an education worth having in 2000.  If the world is changing faster than the school system, the school system is doing an excellent job of moving toward irrelevance.

Here is some further thinking on this idea: https://fryed.wordpress.com/2015/06/29/whats-an-education-thats-worth-having/

Update: 11: Connected Leaders Drive Student Achievement

Student achievement is impacted by connected leadership.  The connections are explained here.

Resources:

Social Media Trends – September 2015

A Wake Up Call for School Leaders: Eric Sheninger

Digital Literacies (Connected Principals)

Innovation and Intellectual Collisions – Bill Ferriter

5 Reasons why Your Portfolio Should be a Blog – George Couros

A Rich Seam – Michael Fullan

The Power of Professional Capital – Andy Hargreaves and Michael Fullan