Tag Archives: Donna Fry

#ONEWORDONT #ONEWORD2017

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Back in August, Carlo Fusco invited me to speak on his podcast about my education passions, and the things that were keeping me up at night.

(The podcast can be found here)

In the podcast, I quickly outline my concern about the gap between what I see happening in schools, and what we need to learn to thrive in 2017 and beyond in the digital economy.

However, it was later in 2016 that I listened to Audrey Watters and Kin Lane in the Tech Gypsies Podcast, when they talked about each and every one of us being responsible to learn the things we must learn to make sense of the world, and to make good decisions.

The entire podcast is worth your time, and I highly recommend listening to it regularly.  If you only have a few minutes, begin around 35:00 (36:45 if you are really short on time, and Caution: Language can be explicit at times)

We need a more digitally literate society.  There are so many examples of why this is true, and I will be exploring those further this week.

Fullan's 6 C's don't require technologyEven when we consider the thinking around 21st Century Learning, and the 6 C’s (or 4 C’s) that we so readily accept, we are missing the part where digital literacies are critical to making good decisions for ourselves and for our children.

Throughout 2016, I worked to craft careful messages to influence others about the importance of digital literacies.

In 2017, rather than a focus on trying to convince others that digital literacies are important, I am committed to providing an open structure where others can learn more about technology with me.

I am convinced that in this world where facts are difficult to find, each and every one of us needs to find our voice and lead learning that will ensure that our connections are creating positive change in our world.

My focus word for 2017 is

LEAD

[rhymes with seed, feed, need]

This spoken word piece, written and performed by Chinaka Hodge at TEDWomen 2016, pushes all of us to find the leader inside ourselves.

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It IS About the Tools

How will, and how do, our students navigate an exponentially changing world?

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How do they manage workflow, information, projects?  How do they know which type of social media best suits their message or their purpose?

How do they know where to find out about job openings, certification opportunities, concerts?

Managing our lives personally and professionally in 2016 requires knowledge of the tools available to us, and the ability to think critically about how to use those tools to best manage ubiquitous information.

Ira Socol has written extensively about this.  Toolbelt Theory is very clearly explained here in an easy read that is well worth your time.

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Last week, I had lunch with some of my colleagues who are also knitters.  What did we talk about? First, “What are you making?’, and then, “What is that you are working with?”.

For example, as I learn to knit wool socks for my granddaughter’s rapidly growing little feet, I need different tools from my other projects.  If I want a sock that fits (task), I need to determine how I will try it on her, and when I will work on it (environment), how much I need to learn about this (skills) and then what TOOLS I need to accomplish the task.

knitting socks

 

Little Chloé lives far from me, so I need to carry an outline of her foot with key foot and ankle measurements, enough pure washable wool for the project, tiny dp needles, and my ipad for the video of how to knit custom toe-up socks (skills).  These tools allow me to complete the project.

If I am knitting thrummed wool mittens, I need different tools.

knitting mitts

Because I fly every week (environment), I can’t use scissors or a knife to cut thrums (airport security will take them) so I make sure I have something like nail clippers to cut the 3.5 inch thrums, stitch holders for the thumb work, several dp needles of different sizes a needle size template so that I don’t choose the wrong needles while working, and a pattern book because I have not internalized how the pattern works yet (skills).

If I am missing any of these tools, I cannot complete the task.

Knowing which tools to choose, based on what the task is, where I am working, and the skill level I have for that project, will allow me to complete the task.

Similarly, I am always rethinking how I manage personal and professional information, and how I share back with my colleagues.

What tool do I use to gather information quickly?

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What tool to I use to organize ideas?  More recently, I have been using Google Keep for quick links and for short notes.Screen Shot 2016-01-10 at 7.11.05 AM

I tend to put my learning notes in “Notes”, and both tools migrate seamlessly across all of my devices.

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How do I communicate over distances? I use Google Hangout with colleagues 24/7.  I just finished Facetiming with my daughter and granddaughter.  Yesterday I Skyped with a colleague in Arizona. And each week, I have a number of scheduled  phone calls and teleconferences.

I have many tools for many purposes available at my disposal. Choosing the right tool for the task (conversation, share documents, visuals, collaborate), given the environment (office, home, driving, airport, cab) and the skills (are colleagues familiar with collaborative documents or Skype?) is a decision I have to make many times every day.

In 2016,  our students need to develop the ability to critically analyze a task, and to choose the tools that are best for them in that situation. This isn’t about “offering choice”, it’s about applying critical thinking skills to the completion of a task.

Earlier this week, I was fortunate to spend time with my Early Years colleagues, and as we talked about the work they are doing around “How Does Learning Happen?”, they expressed their own interpretation of Toolbelt Theory as it applies to young learners.

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They asked me why we thought that it was okay to tell older students that they were to do this task on this computer, using this program, at this time.  How did this way of thinking respect individual abilities?  How did this type of task allow students to demonstrate their learning in the best way they knew how?

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As we consider TELT (Technology Enabled Learning and Teaching), how are we ensuring that students are becoming competent in the key digital literacy of understanding tools, and choosing the tool that is most appropriate for them to complete the task?

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Resources:

Toolbelt Theory – Ira David Socol

How Does Learning Happen? Ontario’s Pedagogy for the Early Years

Let’s UNLEARN a Few Assumptions About School

Many teachers teach the way they were taught.

The B.Ed. program would do well to emphasize the unlearning of wrong assumptions about schooling – like “sit up straight” and “sit still” and “look at the teacher”.

Change won’t happen until we all deeply question our assumptions of what school should look like for kids.

Thanks to Joël McLean for sharing this video on Twitter yesterday.

 

 

Simple Sharing and Organizing: Pinterest for Educators

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Image shared under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial Share-alike license by Monday’s Child.

 

We talk a lot about the importance of openly sharing and curating resources.

One pushback I often hear is, “I just don’t have time”.  I get that.  The job of an educator never ends.  There are always more opportunities to look for that next practice that we could adapt for a particular student need.  There is always one more possibility to try to help a learner move forward.

But what if we could organize our own resources, making them easier to access, and share with others all at the same time?  We could save time for ourselves and for our colleagues – and isn’t that one of the things technology is supposed to do for us anyway?

Earlier today I stumbled upon this fabulous “how-to” video for teachers to help them use Pinterest to organize and share resources.  It is worth your time to watch even if you are using PInterest already.  There are several helpful tips here.

(The video was posted on this blog for primary teachers. Check out the blog for even more tips on curating, organizing and sharing with colleagues.)

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At OSSEMOOC (@OSSEMOOC), we have collated a number of resources on how Pinterest can be used for educators, including for school and system leaders.  I have posted them below for your reference.

 

Here is a quick look at some resources for education leaders:

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Click the image for the link to the OSSEMOOC post: https://ossemooc.wordpress.com/2014/06/05/pinterest-isnt-just-for-crafts-leading-learning-happens-there-too/

 

Here is a step-by-step text guide to connecting and sharing through Pinterest:

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Click on the image for a “how-to” text guide to get started using PInterest for Professional Learning:https://ossemooc.wordpress.com/2014/11/10/ten-minutes-of-connecting-day-10-pinterest-is-for-more-than-just-crafts-and-recipes/

 

Here is a screencast that walks you through the resources included in the above text instructions:

 

 

 

Pinterest as a form of curation (this post includes the above screencast and further resources):

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The screencast and further resources can be found by clicking on this image. https://ossemooc.wordpress.com/2015/05/24/may-24-2015-curating-with-pinterest/

 

Do you need further help in getting started with Pinterest for Professional Learning? Fill out the form here, and OSSEMOOC will add it to the agenda for the 2015-2016 plan for learning.

Intergenerational Digital Literacy

This past week, I read a blog post by Jennifer Casa-Todd: Childrens’ Rights in a Digital World

It is based on this UNICEF publication: Childrens’ Rights in the Digital Age

This is the quote that first attracted my attention:

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“… digital literacy across generations..”

I immediately thought of Ontario’s Renewed Vision for Education.

Screen Shot 2015-06-06 at 9.34.37 AM “Our children, youth and adults will develop the skills and the knowledge that will lead them to become personally successful, economically productive and actively engaged citizens. They will become the motivated innovators, community builders, creative talent, skilled workers, entrepreneurs and leaders of tomorrow.”

http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/about/renewedVision.pdf

When children attend a school, their experiences should not be limited by the knowledge and skills of the adults in the building.   The educators, as digitally literate, connected professionals, should be able to bring the world to the children.

[Edit: Please see the comment below suggesting a rephrasing of the above statement – 

My thinking: “The educators, as digitally literate, connected professionals, SHOULD BE ABLE TO FACILITATE THE CHILDREN’S LINKING THEMSELVES TO THE WORLD.”]

 

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The school building can be a community hub for all to access the world outside the community.  This concept of connected learning is well-explained in the short video below.

The importance of being part of a connected world is emphasized in a recent OECD Report – Connected Minds: Technology and Today’s Learners.

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From OECD: Connected Minds: Technology and Today’s Learners http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/education/connected-minds_9789264111011-en#page23 (Page 23)

So how do we help adults improve their digital literacy?

Earlier this week, HWDSB Grade 1 teacher Aviva Dunsiger led a discussion in the OSSEMOOC session demonstrating how she empowers the parents of her students through the use of technology.

Aviva uses technology to share her students’ learning throughout the day, and provides parents with simple suggestions for how the learning can be extended at home.

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From Slide 15 by @dajbelshaw (Doug Belshaw) http://www.slideshare.net/dajbelshaw/sssc-digital-literacy-workshop

During the recent Google Education On Air Panel Discussion (14:00), Zoe Tabary (from The Economist, Intelligence Unit) reminded us that there is no “extra” time in the school day to add digital literacy. Digital Literacy learning must be integrated into the current curriculum (Sean Rush, Junior Achievement Worldwide).

The recent report (Driving the Skills Agenda) from The Economist states that only 44% of the students surveyed (ages 18-25) feel that schools are providing them with the skills they need to enter the workplace, and while teachers report that technology is changing the way they teach, 77% of students report that schools are not effective in using technology for instruction.

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from Driving the Skills Agenda: Preparing Students for the future. http://www.eiumedia.com/index.php/latest-press-releases/item/1853-education-systems-are-not-arming-students-with-21st-century-skills-eiu-study-finds

How, then, does Digital Literacy for all become an integral part of learning in our schools?

If we are educating learners in our communities to be full participants in society, digital literacy must become a priority.

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From Slide 22 by @dajbelshaw (Doug Belshaw) http://www.slideshare.net/dajbelshaw/sssc-digital-literacy-workshop

Further Resources:

Critical Literacy: Is the Notion of Traditional Reading and Writing Enough? (Langwitches Blog)

Literacy Redefined (Jennifer Casa-Todd)

Driving the Skills Agenda (The Economist)

KISS [Keep It Simple Stupid!]

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Image shared under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial Share-Alike license by Kristina Alexanderson https://www.flickr.com/photos/kalexanderson/5699823858/

 

Tell them what you are going to tell them.

Tell them.

Tell them what you told them.

Keep It Simple, Stupid!

These are great words of advice for creating a presentation.

Could they work as well for those of us designing professional learning?

In his address to the Ontario Leadership Congress in April 2015, Simon Breakspear emphasized the importance of having a clear vision of what future learning looks like, sounds like, feels like.

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Image shared under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License by Stephen Downes https://www.flickr.com/photos/stephen_downes/3808714505/

 

He said, “We cannot lead others into a future we cannot see.”

Our role as leaders is to get out of the conceptual, and move from vision documents to “here, let me show you”.

So what is our profession, then, at the bare bones level?

Teachers cause learning to happen.  They cause learning to happen for every child and student trusted into their care.  Every single one.

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Shared under a Creative Commons Attribution, Non-commercial, Share-Alike License by Darren Kuropatwa https://www.flickr.com/photos/dkuropatwa/4421657130/

 

 

It is not okay for a child to be ‘stuck’ and not learning in a classroom.  It is the responsibility of the teacher to ensure that child is learning.  No teacher has to do this in isolation.  Teachers are aware of their best practice, and they search for their next practice that will help that child learn.  The wider the professional network, the larger the opportunity to find solutions to learning problems.

This remains one of my favourite simplified statements about the work teachers do.

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 Catherine Montreuil, 2013

Let’s keep it simple, and make sure all of our children are on a path of learning.

 

 

 

 

Scaffolding Connected Leadership: You Can Start Here

Does it feel, sometimes, like you have been so busy working that you haven’t had time to stop and recognize how much the work has actually changed?

The world is changing quickly. Leaders in education need to figure out how to keep up.

#OSSEMOOC  gets it. This month, we are putting out little bits, or chunks, of learning to support you in getting connected.

Go here to sign up (signing up isn’t necessary, but it lets up help connect you with others as we go through the month).

Here are the screencasts we have posted so far on the OSSEMOOC site (https://ossemooc.wordpress.com)

 

Please share this information with leaders who may not see it online.

What is OSSEMOOC Anyway?

Leading in a Networked World

Using Twitter Without Logging in

 

Webpages for Professional Learning

Following Blogs by Email