Tag Archives: lead learner

Answering Questions Leaders Ask About Blogging

Today I was fortunate to be part of a group of Ontario leaders* learning through a series of webcasts sponsored by CPCO/ADFO/OPC.  George Couros returned to talk further about how we can use blogs as a personal portfolio.

I was particularly interested in the kinds of questions people were asking about blogging, and how we might be able to provide some more robust responses without the time constraints of the webcast.

Here are a few.

1. How do I get started?

#OSSEMOOC has prepared an extensive outline to help leaders start blogging here: https://ossemooc.wordpress.com/2014/11/22/ten-minutes-of-connecting-day-22-making-thinking-visible-through-blogging/

2. How do I know what the best site is for blogging?

#OSSEMOOC has posted a comparison of blogging sites for educators here:  https://ossemooc.wordpress.com/2014/11/23/ten-minutes-of-connecting-day-23-yes-its-time-to-start-your-own-blog/

3. Aren’t you afraid of making your opinions public and then having them online forever?

Why not start with blogging facts instead of opinions?  When we scaffolded the blogging process for Ontario leaders last year, we asked them to simply share, “What did you learn today?“.  Are you reading a book?  Share what you are reading.  Did you go to a conference, or sit through a webinar?  What did you learn?  There is nothing controversial about simply sharing what you learn with others.

*NOTE: Nicole Hamilton wrote this post last night after attending an OSSEMOOC open mic session.  It is the story of her learning at the session. If we all told the stories of our learning, imagine how much more learning everyone would have access to! 

4. How do you possibly have enough time in the day to do this?

Do you have 10 minutes to devote to your own personal growth?  OSSEMOOC has a series devoted to becoming a connected leader in only 10 minutes a day.  Start here, and stick with it!

5.  How do we get more followers?

Write your blog for yourself.  Post your learning so that it is searchable.  You will never lose your notes again!  Then, share it with OSSEMOOC to post on our site, and share it through other social media.

6. How do I keep my blogging from becoming essay-writing?

Check out other blogs.  See what style works for you.  You can see school and system leader and teacher blogs on the OSSEMOOC website – all in one place.

7. Why do I need to do this?

That requires a post all of its own: https://fryed.wordpress.com/2014/11/25/why-do-we-need-connected-leaders/

Leaders in the webcast were also asked these questions.  What do you think?

Screen Shot 2015-01-20 at 6.10.49 PM

 

 

*leader in the informal sense of the word, not the formal “title”.  If you are working to move your practice forward in education and to model the learning you want to see, you are a leader.  Some questions about the use of the term “instructional leader” can be found here.

How Will You Make Your Own Mess? “Creating a Culture Not of Mimics But of Masters”

We have problems.  Big problems.

Our world is warming up at an alarming rate.  Child poverty is still a reality in spite of “promises” to end it.

Who will solve these problems?

What are we doing every day to move toward solutions?

Commander Hadfield asked this question recently as host of the CBC Radio program “The Current”.

Listen to the short clip here:
http://www.cbc.ca/video/swf/UberPlayer.swf?state=shareaudio&clipId=2508270671&width=512&height=126

“It takes individual action…

What can I do to understand this better, and then based on that understanding, what can action can I take to then help improve things for myself, for Canadians and beyond our borders.”

Commander Hadfield wonders what we are doing wrong in teaching science to our children.  Why does their curiosity disappear as they move through the school system?

 

Screen Shot 2014-10-18 at 10.19.39 PM
Shared under a Creative Commons Licence by timuiuc

 

This short clip might shed some light on the issues.

http://swf.tubechop.com/tubechop.swf?vurl=sXpbONjV1Jc&start=431.61&end=492.43&cid=2794897

 

We can ask the very same questions about math.

This short clip addresses part of the problem, but the full video below is well worth your time.
http://swf.tubechop.com/tubechop.swf?vurl=-tFCVa3lCds&start=366.33&end=539.64&cid=3754815

 

 

How will you help our students to make their own mess?

How are you making your own mess?

What strategies take us away from the path to a society of mimics, and down the road to a society of masters, poised to solve our big problems?