Tag Archives: ossemooc

Your Friends Take Amazing Pictures! – 2/10

This post is part of a 10 day posting challenge issued by Tina Zita. You can’t be a connected educator if you don’t contribute. Sometimes we need a nudge to remember that if nobody shares, nobody learns. Thanks Tina!

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How do we model “network and remix” for our students?

I adore the images my friends post online! Just this morning, I woke up to this in my Flickr feed, contributed by my friend Alan Levine.

Image shared by Alan Levine @cogdog under a CC BY-NC 2.0 license.
Image shared by Alan Levine @cogdog under a CC BY-NC 2.0 license.

So many of my colleagues generously share their work through a Creative Commons License.

Image shared by Darren Kuropatwa under a CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 license.
Image shared by Darren Kuropatwa under a CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 license.

As a blogger and presenter, I want to share their beautiful work with the world.

I make it a priority to choose images created by people I learn with when I am creating a presentation or a new post on my blog.

How do I do this?

I have quickly screencasted the process below.

 

When our students are creating in online spaces, and we encourage them to use sites like Pexels or Pixabay for images that are free of copyright, we are taking a step in the right direction in helping students understand the importance of ownership of creative work.

But how are we enabling students to license and share their own work?  How are we showing students how to network with others who are also creating?  How are we enabling students to promote work they enjoy, and to use what others have made to create something new?

The Innovator's Mindset by George Couros: http://georgecouros.ca/blog/archives/5715
The Innovator’s Mindset by George Couros: http://georgecouros.ca/blog/archives/5715

We promote networking and remixing by modelling it in our professional practice.

Your friends take amazing pictures.  Why not encourage them to license them, share them online and let you use them in your work?

And why not share a few of your own beautiful creations with the world while you are at it?

Image shared by Dean Shareski under a CC-BY-NC-2.0 License. Great socks!
Image shared by Dean Shareski under a CC-BY-NC-2.0 License. Great socks!

 

 

FEATURED IMAGE: Happy Birthday Danika!

Image shared by Andy Forgrave under a CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 license.

 

Resources:

Are Teachers Taught About Creative Commons?

Stages of Being A Maker Learner – Dr. Jackie Gerstein

The Innovator’s Mindset – George Couros

The Innovator’s Mindset Book Club – OSSEMOOC

Alan Levine – For Barking and Wagging and being Top Dog 4ever! (love your work!)

Darren Kuropatwa – Forever Walking and Learning

Andy Forgrave – Forever dedicated to creativity and sharing!

 

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Enabling Educators to be Learners: 1/10

This post is part of a 10 day posting challenge issued by Tina Zita. You can’t be a connected educator if you don’t contribute. Sometimes we need a nudge to remember that if nobody shares, nobody learns. Thanks Tina!

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How can we enable our colleagues to access the rich professional learning opportunities available online?

 

We want to own our own learning.

We want to self-direct our learning.

In 2016, it has never been easier to do this.  The abundance of open, accessible resources is overwhelming.  Learning to manage and organize the information is a new competency.  Learning to reflect, to share, to find, to converse, to connect, to adapt – we are doing this.

Or are we?

We all know colleagues who don’t participate in learning in digital spaces.

For those who provide learning opportunities online, the sphere of influence has a definite, distinct boundary.  They cannot reach the individual who does not engage in digital spaces.

Online teachers struggle to help students who refuse to log into the course.Screen Shot 2016-01-04 at 11.07.59 AM

In the same way, it doesn’t matter how rich, how engaging, how simple to use or how valuable online learning is for educators  if they don’t know where to look for it or how to use the tools that will allow them to access it.

I think that we have done very well in providing digital resources and learning opportunities for teachers.

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Thanks to Julie Balen for collating this year’s #ontwordont

How, now, can we work to enable the educators who still do not access the rich professional learning environment online?

As someone who self-directs their own professional learning online, how can you help one colleague this month to see some value in engaging in online learning or using online resources?

Leverage your PLN to ask for help.  What is the best starting point for one colleague? What can you show them that will help them see the value in engaging in online, self-directed professional learning?

Resources:

OSSEMOOC

Twitter for Absolute Beginners

Leveraging Twitter for Rich Professional Learning

Ontario Edublogs

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Afraid to be Wrong

Over the past few days, mostly while shovelling snow, I have been listening to one particular podcast from the CBC Ideas Program: Knowledge and Democracy.

Screen Shot 2015-12-21 at 7.29.04 AM The program examines the interaction between science and society, looking at the “position” of the discipline “science” in a democracy.

It is of particular interest to me because of our  recent experiences with a government that chose to muzzle scientists and withdraw support from scientific inquiry.

The podcast is a combination of a talk given by Harry Collins at Memorial University in Newfoundland, and a conversation he had with Paul Kennedy.

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It raises important questions about the position of science in society.  I recommend it to anyone interested in how science is perceived in our society, and particularly for those advocating for science instruction and literacy in our public school system.

One sentence that resonates this morning is, “Would I prefer a society where people expose their ideas to criticism, or where they hide them away so nobody can tell them that they are wrong?“.

In our work with open learning, we often hear that education leaders are afraid to openly share their learning – to be “lead learners” – because it will expose what they don’t know.

Schooling promotes this thinking – that it is better to hide your ignorance.  It is very challenging to shift people who excelled in  school – many who then entered schooling as a profession – into believing that it is better to share ideas than to hide them.

How do we create the conditions in our public education system that encourage leaders to be learners, and to openly share their learning with others?

If we want “innovation”, we need to embrace ideas.

The only way to have great ideas, is to have a lot of ideas.

If our school culture values ‘being right’ more than it values learning, we can’t be innovative.

 

 

Resources:

Are we All Scientific Experts Now? (by Harry Collins)

Ideas with Paul Kennedy: Knowledge and Democracy

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Let’s UNLEARN a Few Assumptions About School

Many teachers teach the way they were taught.

The B.Ed. program would do well to emphasize the unlearning of wrong assumptions about schooling – like “sit up straight” and “sit still” and “look at the teacher”.

Change won’t happen until we all deeply question our assumptions of what school should look like for kids.

Thanks to Joël McLean for sharing this video on Twitter yesterday.

 

 

Why Should Educators Understand Social Media?

Educators must understand social media, because this is where our children are:

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/common-sense-media-report-reveals-new-facts-about-kids-use-of-technology-social-media/

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Is shutting down the device the answer?

Do our kids, and our teachers, understand how powerful social media can be for LEARNING?

Isn’t it ESSENTIAL for our school and system leaders to be fully digitally literate?

Here is a great guide to digital life for teens.

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This Guide to Life Online is Produced by http://mediasmarts.ca/ and available free by clicking on the image.

As school and system leaders in education, how are we preparing our youth to be digital leaders in online environments?

How are we modelling the skills,  aptitudes and behaviours that are appropriate in digital spaces?

Sharing from #BIT15: Heidi Siwak’s Keynote Address

If you were unable to attend Heidi Siwak’s closing keynote at #BIT15 this year, you missed an amazing learning experience.

Let’s see if we can share the important points.

Here is Heidi’s link to the resources.

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Here is the storify of the Twitter chat for the event.

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