Tag Archives: share

Retweet or Share?

*Please note that this blog has moved to http://blog.donnamillerfry.com/*

(Please follow the blog at that site.  This site will disappear soon!)

______________

Social media platforms like Twitter and Facebook make sharing easy, much easier, in fact, than reading the full content or discovering the real source of the post.

screen-shot-2016-11-28-at-10-12-56-pm

An algorithm, which you have no control over, determines what content reaches your eyes.

There is no human to complain to when that goes wrong.

Facebook makes money through likes and shares.  It wants you to be engaged and share what you see.  Critical thinking, truth, facts, none of these factor into the profit equation.

In what is now referred to the Post-truth era, it is disturbing to think about how much false content is circulated as fact.  Students struggle to determine the difference between truth and fiction.

As parents and educators, how are we modelling practices that promote facts and reliable sources over clickbait and sensationalism?

On social media, liking, sharing and retweeting  shows others the content that is meaningful to you.  It is a reflection of who you are, and what you believe in.

A decade ago, I used to retweet fairly indiscriminately.  If it looked like a good resource, I shared it.  Then, Ira Socol took the time to question my retweet.  I realized that retweeting is actually a form of curating.  If I want to create value online for others, I need to critically evaluate resources and ideas, and share them with descriptive comments.

What I choose to share reflects my professionalism.  What I choose to share is the value I am creating for others.  Before sharing, I carefully evaluate the source, and I often highlight (in my comments) the part I find most valuable.

Fortunately, I have a loud PLN that will quickly question almost anything I share openly.

Other curators help me sort through the unfathomable amount of information on the web.  Stephen Downes, Doug Belshaw, and Audrey Watters are examples of thought leaders who filter, curate and share information regularly.  I know that there will be value in their curations.

More importantly, what do we do when we encounter colleagues and friends sharing misleading information or sheer fiction as though it were factual? Do we just turn our heads the other way, or do we take the time, like Ira Socol did for me, and challenge the source or the thinking?

Barack Obama said that we can’t move democracy forward if we don’t have a common set of facts to refer to.  Now that we have seen the impact of the propaganda spread through social media, what will we do as educators to shut it down?

How do we ensure our students can critically evaluate information,  triangulate sources, and distinguish between belief and fact?

Featured Image by Wesley Fryer CC-BY-2.0

Advertisements

A Vision of Effective Mathematics Teaching and Learning

What is your vision of effective mathematics teaching and learning in elementary school?

This is a new question for me.  This blog is Learning About Learning, and I have a lot of learning to do about mathematics education.

I am hoping you can help me.

Here are a few of the things I am thinking about right now.  What can you add to this? What have you learned in your own practice? What do you think about when you consider a vision for teaching and learning mathematics?

I think that efficacy is critical.  Students have to believe they can achieve at high levels.  Teachers have to believe that students can achieve at high levels and that teachers have the capacity to  get students to that high level.

Is mathematics skills (as I was taught), or is it ideas (as Dr. Marian Small suggests)?

Is math about making connections?  Is it important that we work with big ideas rather than teaching skills and concepts only in isolation?

I think students have to be able to choose the tools and strategies they need to help them solve problems.

It isn’t up to us to tell them what tool to use, but to teach them how to use many tools effectively so they might pick the one that is right for them in each context.

Math needs to be fun.  Kids need to be the ones doing the thinking. Teaching through problem solving can be very effective (problems are not add-ons).

Teachers need to collaborate with other educators, to share their thinking openly, to challenge the thinking of others, to read and write blogs about their work.  Isolation is a choice, and isolation is unprofessional.  Kids need the thinking of many professionals, not just the one assigned to them.

As I work through #mathleaderNEO over the next few years, I plan to grow this thinking.

I encourage you to share your ideas too.

Featured Image: shonk via Compfight cc

Building a Professional Learning Network (some resources) – 3/10

This post is part of a 10 day posting challenge issued by Tina Zita. You can’t be a connected educator if you don’t contribute. Sometimes we need a nudge to remember that if nobody shares, nobody learns. Thanks Tina!

_________________________________________

Who can help me answer my inquiry question?

Today I worked with my colleagues to support educators in establishing inquiry questions.

Part of our work has been finding the resources to  meet the individual needs of each educator.  The TBCDSB leadership team asked me to join the group to share the process of becoming a networked learner.

I spent the morning getting to know the needs of the learners in the room, and then created these resources tailored to their requests.

Screen Shot 2016-01-19 at 2.23.03 PMI leveraged my own PLN to find the resources.

In learning that several of the educators were teacher-librarians, I asked my colleague, Mark Carbone, about where to find the work he has been doing with Carlo Fusco.

The video we shared can be found here: http://blog.markwcarbone.ca/2015/10/23/shifting-perspectives-on-libraries/

Screen Shot 2016-01-19 at 2.23.44 PM

My colleague, Cindy Carr, shared this video with the group.

This Will Revolutionize Education

Screen Shot 2016-01-19 at 2.23.31 PM The educator inquiries are around Technology Enabled Learning and Teaching.

We were able to share the work of several educators who have an open practice, and who invite others into their classrooms.

Connecting with other educators does have an impact on student learning.  We are working to demonstrate the value of connections.

The shared resources are in the slides embedded below.

Thanks to my PLN for your support today in helping me to support other educators.

From Anita Drossis:

Screen Shot 2016-01-25 at 5.49.57 PM

Enabling Educators to be Learners: 1/10

This post is part of a 10 day posting challenge issued by Tina Zita. You can’t be a connected educator if you don’t contribute. Sometimes we need a nudge to remember that if nobody shares, nobody learns. Thanks Tina!

___________________________________________________________

How can we enable our colleagues to access the rich professional learning opportunities available online?

 

We want to own our own learning.

We want to self-direct our learning.

In 2016, it has never been easier to do this.  The abundance of open, accessible resources is overwhelming.  Learning to manage and organize the information is a new competency.  Learning to reflect, to share, to find, to converse, to connect, to adapt – we are doing this.

Or are we?

We all know colleagues who don’t participate in learning in digital spaces.

For those who provide learning opportunities online, the sphere of influence has a definite, distinct boundary.  They cannot reach the individual who does not engage in digital spaces.

Online teachers struggle to help students who refuse to log into the course.Screen Shot 2016-01-04 at 11.07.59 AM

In the same way, it doesn’t matter how rich, how engaging, how simple to use or how valuable online learning is for educators  if they don’t know where to look for it or how to use the tools that will allow them to access it.

I think that we have done very well in providing digital resources and learning opportunities for teachers.

Screen Shot 2016-01-17 at 8.02.57 AM
Thanks to Julie Balen for collating this year’s #ontwordont

How, now, can we work to enable the educators who still do not access the rich professional learning environment online?

As someone who self-directs their own professional learning online, how can you help one colleague this month to see some value in engaging in online learning or using online resources?

Leverage your PLN to ask for help.  What is the best starting point for one colleague? What can you show them that will help them see the value in engaging in online, self-directed professional learning?

Resources:

OSSEMOOC

Twitter for Absolute Beginners

Leveraging Twitter for Rich Professional Learning

Ontario Edublogs

Screen Shot 2016-01-11 at 1.48.31 PM

 

Why Leave All That Learning Only in Your Head?

So many educators reading so many books that impact their practice!

 

Screen Shot 2015-10-31 at 9.50.21 AM

 

That was my takeaway from #satchat this morning, and #ontedleaders last week as we were challenged to share the reading that was impacting our work at this time.

 

I can’t possibly read all of those books, but my colleagues in my PLN have made me so curious about what is in those books and how it might impact my thinking!

 

 

 

What if we all just blogged about oScreen Shot 2015-10-31 at 9.49.36 AMur reading?

 

 

We ask students to write book reports.

Why don’t we model the importance of sharing our learning in an open, searchable, collaborative way?

If we read a chapter, then reflected, summarized and shared, with appropriate tagging, how could we impact student learning as a community?

 

 

Thank you to those already doing this, such as Stacey Wallwin (@WallwinS) and Brenda Sherry (@brendasherry).

Screen Shot 2015-10-31 at 10.06.00 AM

 

Screen Shot 2015-10-31 at 10.09.25 AM

 

If you haven’t considered it, OSSEMOOC can help you get started with creating a blog. and with viewing the blogs of other educators as examples.

As you think about your own PLN, consider what you are learning, AND what you are contributing to the learning of others.

Screen Shot 2015-10-31 at 9.51.03 AM

 

Resources:

Making Thinking Visible Through Blogging

Yes, It’s Time to Start Your Own Blog

A Beginner’s Guide to Starting a Blog

 

Are Teachers Taught About Creative Commons?

Earlier this week, I worked with my fellow OSAPAC member (and chair) Mark Carbone to share some thinking around Creative Commons Licensing with educators at #CATC15

The title of this post, “Are Teachers Taught About Creative Commons”, was one of the questions from the group of educators we were learning with.  This brings up another issue about who owns the learning when it comes to teacher education, but that question is for another day.  For now, it is important to understand why being fluent in using Creative Commons is very important to the maker culture in the classroom.

There are many resources for educators to learn about how to use Creative Commons.  We wanted to focus more on the “why“.

Last week, George Couros shared his work on the innovator’s mindset.  He suggested that innovative practice requires both networking and remix.

Screen Shot 2015-08-13 at 10.58.52 PM

How do we encourage “remix” with our students and educators?

Stages of Becoming a Maker
Image created and shared by Dr. Jackie Gerstein https://usergeneratededucation.wordpress.com/2015/07/28/stages-of-being-a-maker-learner/

If we are going to encourage copying and remixing, it is essential that teachers understand proper use of licensing.

Teachers need to help students license their work in a way that will encourage properly attributed use, and encourage further creativity.

Screen Shot 2015-08-18 at 8.04.48 AM
Shared under a Creative Commons attribution non-commercial share-alike license by Darren Kuropatwa

Modelling the use of Creative Commons Licensing of work provides a structure for thinking in a positive way about creativity, sharing, and remixing.

Where can you find more help in understanding Creative Commons Licensing?  Bill Ferriter has provided an excellent page of resources here.  In Ontario, Rodd Lucier is one of our best experts and he has written profusely on the topic.

How do you find Creative Commons Licensed work?  A number of search engines can be found here:  http://search.creativecommons.org/

Resources

Compfight – choose CC licensed images (HTML embed code for attribution provided for bloggers and online teachers)

OSSEMOOC – Photo Sharing with Flickr

This amazing resource from Gail Desler: Can I Use That? A Guide To Creative Commons

Simple Sharing and Organizing: Pinterest for Educators

Screen Shot 2015-06-14 at 12.40.29 PM
Image shared under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial Share-alike license by Monday’s Child.

 

We talk a lot about the importance of openly sharing and curating resources.

One pushback I often hear is, “I just don’t have time”.  I get that.  The job of an educator never ends.  There are always more opportunities to look for that next practice that we could adapt for a particular student need.  There is always one more possibility to try to help a learner move forward.

But what if we could organize our own resources, making them easier to access, and share with others all at the same time?  We could save time for ourselves and for our colleagues – and isn’t that one of the things technology is supposed to do for us anyway?

Earlier today I stumbled upon this fabulous “how-to” video for teachers to help them use Pinterest to organize and share resources.  It is worth your time to watch even if you are using PInterest already.  There are several helpful tips here.

(The video was posted on this blog for primary teachers. Check out the blog for even more tips on curating, organizing and sharing with colleagues.)

Screen Shot 2015-06-14 at 12.20.35 PM

 

At OSSEMOOC (@OSSEMOOC), we have collated a number of resources on how Pinterest can be used for educators, including for school and system leaders.  I have posted them below for your reference.

 

Here is a quick look at some resources for education leaders:

Screen Shot 2015-06-14 at 12.23.20 PM
Click the image for the link to the OSSEMOOC post: https://ossemooc.wordpress.com/2014/06/05/pinterest-isnt-just-for-crafts-leading-learning-happens-there-too/

 

Here is a step-by-step text guide to connecting and sharing through Pinterest:

Screen Shot 2015-06-14 at 12.27.00 PM
Click on the image for a “how-to” text guide to get started using PInterest for Professional Learning:https://ossemooc.wordpress.com/2014/11/10/ten-minutes-of-connecting-day-10-pinterest-is-for-more-than-just-crafts-and-recipes/

 

Here is a screencast that walks you through the resources included in the above text instructions:

 

 

 

Pinterest as a form of curation (this post includes the above screencast and further resources):

Screen Shot 2015-06-14 at 12.31.40 PM
The screencast and further resources can be found by clicking on this image. https://ossemooc.wordpress.com/2015/05/24/may-24-2015-curating-with-pinterest/

 

Do you need further help in getting started with Pinterest for Professional Learning? Fill out the form here, and OSSEMOOC will add it to the agenda for the 2015-2016 plan for learning.